Resident Evil: Degeneration (2008)

Posted: November 13, 2011 in Action, Animated, Horror

In the wake of the Umbrella Corporation’s downfall and the destruction of Raccoon City, Senator Ron Davis and the WilPharma Corporation are in pursuit of a t-virus vaccine but are viewed as the reason for much of the biological warfare taking place across the globe. At an airport in Harvardville, Claire Redfield meets up with an associate from TerraSave, an organization attempting to combat WilPharma and their activities. When the senator is caught walking through the terminal, a protestor in a white mask hobbles toward him. After pushed aside, an infected man stumbles into one of the officers and spreads the infections. After a plane crash containing an infected man smashes into the terminal and releases a wave of infected people on the freightened crowd, the military locks down the terminal. A team containing Angela Miller, Greg Glenn and special force member Leon Kennedy storm into the terminal to rescue the survivors. Meanwhile, there is a plot thickening within the WilPharma facility, where there is a stockpile of medical and viral research and concerns for terrorist activities.

Being an animated feature, acting is only in the vocals. The cast is as follows…Paul Mercier (Leon Kennedy), Alyson Court (Claire Redfield), Laura Bailey (Angela Miller), Roger Smith (Curtis Miller), Crispin Freeman (Frederic Downing), Michael Sorich (Senator Ron Davis) and Steve Blum (Greg Glenn). Rather than a breakdown of each character, the simple overview of the acting is that it complements the feel of the film. There are moments of over-emoting that tend to coincide with the more dramatic action scenes but it generally appears to fit the mood of the film sequences.

Makoto Kamiya’s first dip into the zombie-filled franchise takes a step away from the larger storyline and focuses on events that occurred outside of the Raccoon City fiasco but before the world becomes overrun by the t-virus. Claire Redfield and Leon Kennedy are the returning characters to provide more of a continuation to the series. While they are vital to the storyline, there are a number of elements missing, including Adam Wesker (the mastermind behind the spread of the t-virus). It is easy to get lost in the plot as there are two competing organizations (WilPharma and TerraSave) that both seem to be misguided or at least misled. TerraSave serves as the human rights group that fights to save people, where WilPharma appears to play both the villain and the attempted savior. WilPharma’s activities certainly appear to be misguided, though there also appear to be greater forces at work.

Now to focus on the presentation…The most disappointing part of the movie is actually in the pairing of the graphics and the vocals. The characters lips look so pouty and full that they seem to struggle matching their words with their mouth movements. The graphic style is smooth and motions are fairly clean. While individual characters and skin features may not exhibit a lot of variation, the hairstyles seem to exhibit the continued improvement of movie graphic abilities. The zombies are fairly well done as the infection continues to move through their system, which is best exhibited during the earlier infection scenes in the airport. As for the Curtis g-virus transformation, the detail and creepiness is certainly well done. The fact that this is an animated film, Kamiya is able to exaggerate the abilities of Curtis’s and the distances Leon gets thrown in the fight with Curtis. Otherwise when you eliminate the transformed Curtis scenes, the rest of the action is fairly realistic.

While not as integral to the overall storyline of the Resident Evil series, this film incorporates a number of aspects to be enjoyable for fans of the series. Zombies are important to the story but also only encompass about half of the fighting through the film, so be prepared for something a little unexpected.

Dan’s Rating: 2.5/5

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