Hanna: Adapt or Die (2011)

Posted: July 22, 2012 in Action, Crime, Mystery, Thriller

Raised in the wilderness by her father, Hanna has never truly know the modern world. She has been trained in combat, hunting, languages and general knowledge. After wondering about the outside world and hoping to rejoin it, she convinces her father to give her permission. He warns her that she will be hunted once she attempts to rejoin society, but he gives her instructions of where they can meet once they leave the secluded house. After the house is raided by CIA operatives, Hanna is captured and taken to a facility for interrogation. Making her escape into the desert, she eventually meets up with a family on vacation and travels with them on route back to Germany. With her escape from the facility, Marissa Wiegler sends out mercenaries to capture Hanna and her father.

Starring: Saorise Ronan (Hanna), Eric Bana (Erik Heller), Cate Blanchett (Marissa Wiegler), Vicky Krieps (Johanna Zadek), Olivia Williams (Rachel), Jason Flemyng (Sebastian), Jessica Barden (Sophie), Aldo Maland (Miles), Tom Hollander (Isaacs), Sebastian Hulk (Titch), Joel Basman (Razor), Martin Wuttke (Knepfler)

The young star of this film has an intensity that is quite impressive for an actress of her age. Ronan’s character allows her to exhibit her killer instincts while also portraying the innocence of someone who has no memory of modern conveniences. Eric Bana is entertaining in his more action-oriented scenes, but he also has a few brief moments of compassion with Ronan. Blanchett seems like a woman possessed at times in her quest to take out her targets. Similarly, Hollander’s calm is deceptive considering the focus of his character’s task of destroying Hanna.

  

Typically responsible for more dramatic stories, Joe Wright decided to take a venture into an action thriller that stars an unlikely heroine. Hanna’s life did not start in the wilderness, but she knows little of what life is like outside of the snowy terrain of Finland. Hidden from the CIA, Erik has kept her a secret to prevent her capture and potential murder. He trained her to be able to fend for herself when the day came that she wanted to leave her simple life. Marissa Wiegler knew that Erik would one day resurface, but did not expect that both he and Hanna would be on the run. While Hanna was able to fend for herself, she began to discover that there is something more to her existence. Marissa unexpectedly reveals a bombshell to her that caused her world to crumble around her and she realized her father did not prepare her for everything.

  

Hanna’s existence is one of conflict. Her father prepares her in so many different ways to handle the world, but one of the most entertaining scenes of the film involves her inexperience with all things modern. While provided a place to stay while in Morocco, the attendant shows her the amenities, most of which confuse her. As the electric kettle heats up and starts steaming, she activates a chain reaction that turns on all of the amenities in the room and scares her off. Soon after in Spain, she goes with Sophie to a party and is about to kiss a boy. In self defense, she flips him over and kills the mood. Both scenes are great representations of the uneasiness that highlight her mortality even with her training and gifts for survival.

Overall, the film is enjoyable, but there are a number of slower parts, particularly at the beginning of the film. Clarity of the storyline and reason for Marissa’s chase are unclear until well into the second half of the film. Still, Saorise is entertaining in her action sequences and creates an intrigue of what happens to her next after the end of the film.

Dan’s Rating: 3.0/5

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